Three quarters of a footprint

 

Finally, a good book after a long time. The honest perspective, humor and historical background of the places visited by the author keep the reader engrossed. In the beginning, it wouldn’t be a surprise if someone brushed aside the book as a derogatory book about India. But if you go after 10 pages, you realize it is just an honest view of a foreigner. The precise amount of historical background added to the experiences keep the stories interesting and does not read like a history book.

The experiences in the book are from Joe’s travels mostly in south India during early 90’s, which adds a certain sense of charm. Mentions of cassette players, Walkman, having to go to a travel agent to book tickets, asking people for directions brings a touch of antiqueness to the entire book. He journals the journeys, people and not just the destinations. His honest narration of the events and experiences seemed harsh initially, but then he also makes ‘harsh’ observations of other travellers (some from his own country).

Get the book if you like to read about travel and history.

BTW, that’s one book down from the books I plan to read before end of this year.